happiness

Chose Happiness

In today’s society the highest raising concerns within teenagers is the prevalence in the importance of socializing, fitting in, and behaving in a certain way. There is such pressure in the idea of finding yourself, but it must be within the realms that society approves of.

Within the early years of your life, when you barely have the power to make decisions because you follow rules from the roof in which you live under, you are expected to chose your path. Now, path is a very suited metaphorical term. All your life you walk from decision to decision: what will I eat for lunch; a greasy burger or a salad? Which outfit am I going to put on tomorrow, the one with the polka dots or a baggy sweater? Do I go out with my friends Friday night or do I stay in to work on my late assignment for Geography?

All decisions seem to fall under the categories of either: you pick what you want or what is best for you. Society is under the impression that you cannot have both. By their standards: what you want is never what is best for you.

If it makes you happy, how is it not the best thing for you? Now, you are faced once again with your path. It is a long and treturous road that will throw obstacles at you with every chance it encounters. In the darkest wrong turns that you make along your journey you may wonder: what is the point? The point seems to be to reach some sort of end goal that will make everything worth the while.

What happens if you don’t know your end goal? It is a horrifyingly daunting but inevitable choice it seems that we all must make in order to find yourself. Society points you in a direction and you must decide to follow it or not.

In the early few years of your life people are forced to contemplate then decide their entire future. It is a nearly impossible task to find yourself, much less decide the outcome of the sum total of your life.

Every action, every move, and every decision you make will result in the outcome of your whole life. That is the message that society throws at you. That once you chose a path, there is no going back. So the headliner is, stay home and eat your vegetables.

Now, I am not debating the pros and cons of healthy eating, doing your homework, or having a social life. I am viewing the long awaited question: can what makes you happy, be what is best for you? Yes, of COURSE it can.

Do you remember the very first dream you ever imagined? What did you imagine of yourself? To slay dragons or travel space? Those were all fantasies born without being encompassed by the concerns of reality, money, or the realistic possibly of the dream. So, maybe it is best to chose your future and find who you truly are within these years when you’re not restricted by the ugliness of the world telling you that your dreams are not real. Society expects everyone to not only find who they are, and follow their dreams, but it must be within the whims of their approval. Does this not seem slightly redundant and ridiculous? This is the point where you point your metaphorical middle finger high at the metaphorical road society sets, and do what you want despite all the restrictions.

When you follow the road that makes you happy, you will end up finding yourself because you chose what you love. Now, you are taking a risking chance because maybe you won’t end up a millionaire going on cruises every month for a living. But, you will be happy. And in the end, how is being happy not the best thing for you?